#66 - (Glenn Hoffman)

This week there is no legal section of the blog.
Now for the Opening Day memory:
Probably more well known for being the older brother of San Diego Padres star reliever Trevor Hoffman, Glenn Hoffman played shortstop in the majors for 9 years and has coached for the Los Angeles Dodgers and Padres for close to double that. Glenn played for the Boston Red Sox from 1980-1987, the Dodgers for part of 1987 and for the Angels in 1989. He was known more for his defensive abilities than his offense, ending his career with a .242 batting average and 23 home runs. Glenn was named the interim manager of the Dodgers for the second half of the 1998 season (replacing Bill Russell). In 1999, Glenn was a coach for the Dodgers under new manager Davey Johnson and he continued as a coach for the Dodgers through the 2005 season. In 2006, he moved to the Padres where he has coached since. Here is his Opening Day memory.

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#65 - (Dan Mattingly)

This week there is no legal section of the blog.
Now for the Opening Day memory:
As my all time favorite player along with Mickey Mantle, it is painful for me to see Don Mattingly–also known as “Donnie Baseball” and the “Hit Man”–in anything but the Pinstripes and more so not in the Hall of Fame (but I will try not to lament further here). From 1984-1989, Don arguably was the best player in the game and on the fast track to Cooperstown. I made the friend, who I came with, leave a New York Giants game at half time when they were down 27-14 so I could go watch Don battle Dave Winfield for the 1984 batting title, which Don won on the last day of the season .343 to .340 by going 4-5. By the way, the Giants came back and won 28-27, and I told my angry friend to be thankful we didn’t stay or his team would have lost. Don followed up his 1984 batting title (he also hit 23 HRs, had 110 RBIs, 44 2Bs and led the AL with 207 hits) with the MVP in 1985 with this hitting line–35 HR 145 RBI .323 AVG and 48 2Bs. He got robbed by the sportswriters and Roger Clemens (the Cy Young award was enough) in the MVP voting in 1986 when he hit .352 with 31 HRs, 113 RBIs and an AL leading 238 hits and 53 2Bs (both Yankee records) and might have won the batting title again if Wade Boggs didn’t sit out the last game of the season to preserve his lead. In 1987, Don hit .327 with 30 HRs and 115 RBIs including 8 consecutive HRs and 6 grand slams, both of which tied major league records.

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