#55 - (Jim Palmer)

This week there is no legal section of the blog.
Now for the Opening Day memory:
Like fellow Hall of Famer Robin Yount, Jim Palmer played his entire career for the same team and was elected to the Hall of Fame on the first ballot. Jim pitched for the Baltimore Orioles from 1965-1984, although he missed the entire 1968 season due to injury. Interestingly, he was left unprotected by the Orioles in the 1969 expansion draft, but was selected by neither the Kansas City Royals nor the Seattle Pilots. A big mistake (with hindsight, of course) on both of their parts. Just four days after his return from the disabled list in 1969, Jim threw a no-hitter against the Oakland A’s. In the 1970′s, Jim won a total of 186 games, more than any other pitcher. His career accomplishments, along with his spats with his former manager Earl Weaver, are legendary. They include, but are not limited to, winning 20 or more games 8 times, 3 Cy Young awards, 4 Gold Glove awards, 6 time All Star, 8 postseason appearances including pitching on 6 pennant winning teams, a 3 time World Series champion and a career record of 268-152 with a 2.86 ERA, 2212 strikeouts, 53 shutouts and 211 complete games in 3948 innings pitched. His best season was 1975, where he led the American League with 23 wins, 10 shutouts and a 2.09 ERA, and won the second of his 3 Cy Young’s. Jim is the only pitcher to have won a World Series game in 3 different decades (his win in the 1983 World Series against the Philadelphia Phillies is his final career win), the only member of the Orioles to be on all 6 Orioles pennant winning teams, the youngest pitcher ever to pitch a World Series shutout at age 20 in 1966, and a member of the last starting rotation with four 20 game winners (along with Dave McNally, Mike Cuellar and Pat Dobson) and the last surviving of those four. In his 19 year career, Jim never gave up a grand slam or back to back home runs. Jim was enshrined in the Hall of Fame in 1990. Since his retirement, he has been a color commentator and Jockey underwear spokesman and model, and involved with raising money for Cystic Fibrosis. Here are his Opening Day memories:

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#54 - (Robin Yount)

This week there is no legal section of the blog.
Now for the Opening Day memory:
First ballot Hall of Famer Robin Yount spent his entire 20 year playing career with the Milwaukee Brewers and still holds many of their statistical career records. He was selected by them third in the 1973 draft, right ahead of fellow Hall of Famer Dave Winfield. He made his Brewers’ debut at age 18, and went 0 for his first 4 games, before hitting a game winning home run in his 6th game. No 18 year old has hit a major league home run since. During the 1975 season, Robin broke Mel Ott’s 47 year old record for most consecutive games played before age 20. In 1978, Robin created some controversy with the Brewers by threatening to retire and play golf unless he was paid what he thought he deserved. He had his best year, in which he won his first of two MVP awards, in 1982, hitting .331 with 210 hits (his only year with 200+ hits) 29 HR’s and 114 RBI’s (all career highs). He also led the league in slugging percentage and total bases. The Brewers were tied with the Baltimore Orioles on the last day of the season and they played each other for the American League pennant. All Robin did was homer in his first two at bats against fellow Hall of Famer Jim Palmer (among his 4 hits) in a 10-2 Brewers pounding of the Orioles. Robin then made his only career World Series appearance, but his Brewers were beaten in 7 by the St. Louis Cardinals. Injuries resulted in Robin moving to the outfield in 1985. He became the Brewers full time CF in 1986 and won his second MVP award in 1989. He is one of only 4 players to win the MVP in two different positions (the others are Hank Greenberg, Stan Musial and Alex Rodriguez). He was an All Star in 1980, 1982 and 1983, won the Gold Glove as an SS in 1982 and won the Silver Slugger award in 1980, 1982 and 1989. He retired with a lifetime .285 batting average, 251 HRs, 1632 runs scored and 1406 RBIs. He had more hits than anyone else in the 1980′s. He got his 3000th hit in 1992 and the Brewers retired his number 19 in 1994. After his retirement, he was a coach for the Arizona Diamondbacks and the Brewers. Here are his Opening Day memories:

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